True I took two photos of the Moon, one at 8:53 p.m. EDT last night (left) and the other at 3:33 a.m. EDT this morning. They show the satellite in ever-so-slightly different phases, but because they were taken 6 hours and 40 minutes apart, and because the Moon seems to librate, each photo sees at a slightly different angle. The angles are just different enough, and your brain is just powerful enough, that if you cross your eyes and put one image on top of another, you can convince yourself that it's a 3D image. Try it! Alex Farris
A lifeguard, some Zumba, and the Moon | Alex Farris Photo Blog
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2012.08.30
This month has been a bit busy. It didn't start off well, as I attended funeral and memorial services for two friends, Bryan Kolski and Jessica Adkins, at the end of July. Things have picked up since then, though, and among research work, a wedding and starting some volunteer reading for IRIS, I got two photo assignments from The Indianapolis Star. The first, taken on the 3rd and published on the 9th, was of a Greenwood man returning to the pool in Plainfield where he almost drowned in June, just to thank the lifeguards who saved him, especially Shelby Partin, who saw him first. The second, taken the 13th and published on the front of the West Local Living section today, was of a local YMCA that's gotten very popular and expanded a lot of its services, including the Zumba classes.

Sadly, the month ended with another death: that of Neil Armstrong, the first human to set foot on the Moon. He, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins traveled more than 230,000 miles just so Armstrong and Aldrin could walk on the Moon for a little over two hours. I've always been a fan of NASA, ever since I watched Apollo 13 for the 10th time at age 8, so while I wasn't alive on July 20, 1969, I still feel great awe that we did it and some sadness that Neil is gone. So, at the end of this entry is a set of pictures that should give a bit of perspective. It's my own way of doing what the Armstrong family asked people to do: "Honor his example of service, accomplishment and modesty, and the next time you walk outside on a clear night and see the moon smiling down at you, think of Neil Armstrong and give him a wink."

Flip the light switch
Lifeguard Shelby Partin (far left) talks with other Splash Island lifeguards who, on June 10, helped save the life of Mark Alderson of Greenwood, in Plainfield, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. Lifeguard Shelby Partin (far left) talks with other Splash Island lifeguards who, on June 10, helped save the life of Mark Alderson of Greenwood, in Plainfield, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. Alex Farris
Mark Alderson of Greenwood thanks Splash Island lifeguards who saved his life, in Plainfield, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. On June 10, lifeguard Shelby Partin (yellow shirt) was the first to notice Alderson face-down in the pool, and she and other lifeguards kept him alive before he was transferred to IU Health Methodist Hospital. Mark Alderson of Greenwood thanks Splash Island lifeguards who saved his life, in Plainfield, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. On June 10, lifeguard Shelby Partin (yellow shirt) was the first to notice Alderson face-down in the pool, and she and other lifeguards kept him alive before he was transferred to IU Health Methodist Hospital. Alex Farris
Mark Alderson and Splash Island lifeguard Shelby Partin embrace after Alderson thanked Partin and other lifeguards for saving his life in June, in Plainfield, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. Mark Alderson and Splash Island lifeguard Shelby Partin embrace after Alderson thanked Partin and other lifeguards for saving his life in June, in Plainfield, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. Alex Farris
Mark Alderson talks with WISH-TV's Scott Sander after thanking Splash Island's Shelby Partin and other lifeguards for saving his life in June, in Plainfield, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. Mark Alderson talks with WISH-TV's Scott Sander after thanking Splash Island's Shelby Partin and other lifeguards for saving his life in June, in Plainfield, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. Alex Farris
YMCA volunteer Keith Isom celebrates a successful ping-pong volley with Joey while Joey's mother takes a Turbo Kick class at the Hendricks Regional Health YMCA in Avon, Monday, Aug. 13, 2012. YMCA volunteer Keith Isom celebrates a successful ping-pong volley with Joey while Joey's mother takes a Turbo Kick class at the Hendricks Regional Health YMCA in Avon, Monday, Aug. 13, 2012. Alex Farris
Zumba instructor Suzi Brown leads an exercise class at the Hendricks Regional Health YMCA in Avon, Monday, Aug. 13, 2012. Zumba instructor Suzi Brown leads an exercise class at the Hendricks Regional Health YMCA in Avon, Monday, Aug. 13, 2012. Alex Farris
Zumba class instructor Suzi Brown (bottom) leads a class in exercising to V.I.C.'s Zumba class instructor Suzi Brown (bottom) leads a class in exercising to V.I.C.'s "Wobble" at the Hendricks Regional Health YMCA in Avon, Monday, Aug. 13, 2012. Alex Farris
Zumba instructor Suzi Brown stands on the bleachers as she leads an exercise class at the Hendricks Regional Health YMCA in Avon, Monday, Aug. 13, 2012. Zumba instructor Suzi Brown stands on the bleachers as she leads an exercise class at the Hendricks Regional Health YMCA in Avon, Monday, Aug. 13, 2012. Alex Farris
I took two photos of the Moon, one at 8:53 p.m. EDT last night (left) and the other at 3:33 a.m. EDT this morning. They show the satellite in ever-so-slightly different phases, but because they were taken 6 hours and 40 minutes apart, and because the Moon seems to librate, each photo sees at a slightly different angle. The angles are just different enough, and your brain is just powerful enough, that if you cross your eyes and put one image on top of another, you can convince yourself that it's a 3D image. Try it! I took two photos of the Moon, one at 8:53 p.m. EDT last night (left) and the other at 3:33 a.m. EDT this morning. They show the satellite in ever-so-slightly different phases, but because they were taken 6 hours and 40 minutes apart, and because the Moon seems to librate, each photo sees at a slightly different angle. The angles are just different enough, and your brain is just powerful enough, that if you cross your eyes and put one image on top of another, you can convince yourself that it's a 3D image. Try it! Alex Farris
On another photo taken Tuesday night, I've marked the Apollo 11 landing site. Keep in mind, this is 238,866 miles away. And we've been there. On another photo taken Tuesday night, I've marked the Apollo 11 landing site. Keep in mind, this is 238,866 miles away. And we've been there. Alex Farris

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I rented a 70-200 from BorrowLenses.com for the Super Bowl before I got my own. I liked them; I think you will, too.